Deputy Chief of Operations, Kevin Slattery

Deputy Chief Slattery started his career at the Framingham Police Department in 1985 after graduating from Westfield State University with a Bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice. He worked as a patrol officer. He then was assigned to the narcotics unit in 1987. He also served as a general duty investigator until he was promoted to the position of Sergeant in 1992. He was a patrol supervisor on all 3 shifts and then became the supervisor of the narcotics unit and the evening shift general duty detectives.

Experience

While working in narcotics he had the opportunity to serve in several federal and state task force narcotics investigations targeting drugs and gangs. He also served as a supervisor of General Duty investigators.

In 2004 Slattery was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant. He was reassigned to patrol where he served as a shift Commander. He has been a Commanding officer working on all 3 shifts of the Police Department. Slattery was then reassigned to work on a DEA task force investigation targeting narcotics activity and gang violence in Framingham.

Slattery was then reassigned to be the Commanding Officer of Investigative Services. In that position he oversaw the general Duty Investigations, Street Crimes Investigations, Narcotic Investigations, School Resource Officers, and Crime Scene Services.

In October of 2013 Slattery was appointed to Deputy Chief in charge of operations of the Framingham Police Department.

Lawyer: Framingham deputy chief being used as scapegoat December 16, 2016
Jim Haddadin 617-863-7144 Metrowest Daily News
FRAMINGHAM - A veteran police officer who spent more than five months on administrative leave after being taken off the job earlier this year defended his record Friday, accusing police officials of retaliating against him to distract from wide-ranging problems he helped uncover.

In a statement released by his lawyer, Deputy Chief Kevin Slattery also defended his use of sick time to remain off the job for several weeks, noting that he has accrued more than a year's worth of sick days through his service to the town.

"The Framingham Police Department is replete with personnel, administrative and procedural problems," the statement reads. "(Slattery), a 31-year veteran of the department, has uncovered and reported several of those problems. As a result of his disclosures, the department is now retaliating against (Slattery) and using him as a scapegoat to shift the focus from the department's problems elsewhere."

A report published Friday in the Daily News detailed Slattery's time away from work this year - a prolonged absence that began when he was placed on administrative leave May 3. Slattery was accused at the time of making a remark that implied he hoped a lieutenant would intervene in a case involving the lieutenant's daughter - a potential violation of ethics rules.

Slattery maintains he was never asked to explain the remark. The incident was reviewed by the police chief, who told Slattery there was no need for him to be interviewed, according to his lawyer.

The town also retained an independent investigator to look into a separate "personnel" matter involving Slattery, though officials have yet to disclose any information about the inquiry, which remains ongoing.

Slattery remained on paid leave for a combined 155 days while the town investigated his conduct, split between two periods from May to July and from August to late October. Slattery then went on sick leave Oct. 27 after being ordered to return to work, according to the town. He has remained off the job since, and is expected to be out through at least Jan. 3.

Responding to questions from the newspaper this week, town officials declined to provide information about Slattery's medical condition.

According to his lawyer, Slattery suffers from an "underlying chronic illness" that has been "exacerbated" by work-related stress caused by the department's decision to place him on leave.

"Consequently, (Slattery) is now out on sick leave under documented medical advice by his personal physician," the lawyer's statement reads.

Slattery's attorney also defended his client's work for the department, writing that Slattery has received numerous awards and commendations and recently helped exonerate an innocent man who was wrongfully convicted of child rape charges in 1983.

The case was highlighted in a Dec. 12 report produced by the New England Center for Investigative Reporting and published by The Boston Globe. The story described Slattery's work to identify the real attacker, who had allegedly committed other crimes in the area with the same hallmarks as the brutal rape.

Kevin O'Loughlin, the former Framingham man who was wrongfully jailed for the crime, is now suing the police department. Slattery is expected to testify if the suit goes to trial, according to his lawyer.

Slattery also played a pivotal role in uncovering the alleged theft of money from the police department's evidence room, according to his lawyer, discovering evidence bags in a truck belonging to the former evidence room supervisor. The matter has since been handed over to the state attorney general's office for potential criminal charges.

"Prior to the spring of 2016, there had been no internal complaints filed against (Slattery)," the statement reads, adding that Slattery "has had an exemplary career and received numerous awards and commendations."

Jim Haddadin can be reached at 617-863-7144 or jhaddadin@wickedlocal.com. Follow him on Twitter: @JimHaddadin.

http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/article/20161216/NEWS/161217444

Framingham: Deputy police chief on sick leave December 16, 2016
Jim Haddadin 617-863-7144 Metrowest Daily News
FRAMINGHAM - After spending more than five months on administrative leave, one of the police department's highest-ranking officers has yet to return to work and could remain out until next year.

Deputy Police Chief Kevin Slattery was relieved of duty in May amid an investigation into comments he made about a subordinate.

Slattery has remained off the job since, according to town records - sidelined by personnel investigations, but also using a combination of vacation and sick time that has prolonged his absence.

Slattery has spent the last 50 days on sick leave, according to information provided by the police department. While he was scheduled to return to work Monday, Slattery recently provided the town a sick note indicating he will now remain off the job through at least early January.

Officials are reviewing the note, according to the town's lawyer. The town declined to comment further on the nature of Slattery's medical condition, saying only that he went on sick leave at the advice of his doctor.

Time away from work

As head of operations for the police department, Slattery oversees the patrol division and street crimes unit, as well as crime scene services and community policing efforts. Town records show he earned a little more than $142,000 last year.

Slattery was officially relieved of his duties on May 3. Chief Kenneth Ferguson previously declined to comment on the reasons behind the move, saying only that it was related to an "active investigation." Town Counsel Christopher Petrini later divulged that Slattery was placed on leave "due to an alleged improper verbal comment he made regarding a subordinate."

Slattery remained on paid leave for a combined 155 days while the town investigated his conduct, split between two periods from May to July and from August to late October.

In between, Slattery used about three weeks of vacation time, beginning July 12 and ending Aug. 2, according to the police department.

In all, Slattery earned close to $53,850 while he was on paid leave, excluding the time he was on vacation, according to the department.

After being ordered to return to work in October, Slattery went on sick leave Oct. 27. He is expected to be out until Jan. 3, putting his sick leave period at a minimum of 68 days.

'Inappropriate' remark

While officials have largely remained tight-lipped about Slattery's circumstances, a representative from the police department and the town's lawyer provided additional details this week in response to questions from the Daily News.

Records made public by the town for the first time indicate Slattery's comment pertained to an investigation involving a police lieutenant's daughter. While speaking with Deputy Chief Steven Trask and another officer, Slattery allegedly made a remark that implied he hoped the lieutenant would intervene in the case involving the lieutenant's daughter - a potential violation of police rules.

During the April 25, 2016 conversation, Trask "stated something to the effect of he hopes that (the lieutenant) does not do anything unethical with respect to the investigation of the incident," to which Slattery allegedly replied, "Let him."

Slattery's comment - later recounted in a notice issued by the police chief - was "interpreted to mean that (Slattery was) hoping that (the lieutenant) crossed ethical boundaries in the matter."

After reviewing the case, an independent investigator concluded that Slattery indeed made an inappropriate statement, according to Petrini, the town's lawyer. Petrini declined to specify whether Slattery was disciplined, but wrote that the police department took "appropriate action" based on the findings.

"The town does not comment on specific employee discipline," Petrini wrote.

The town's investigator is also looking into a second "personnel matter" involving Slattery, but that probe "has not been completed and the town will have no comment while that investigation is pending," Petrini wrote.

No investigative records

The Daily News in November requested access to all investigative reports produced by the town or the police department that stem from allegations of misconduct by Slattery.

In response, Petrini wrote that neither the town nor the police department has any such reports in its custody. Rather, the town undertook a "review of a personnel matter" relating to Slattery, Petrini wrote.

The Daily News has since filed a broader request seeking all records generated through the so-called "personnel" review, as well as any reports or written findings issued by the town's investigator.

State courts have previously held that records of internal investigations into the conduct of police officers cannot be withheld under the public records law, finding that such records are "different in kind from the ordinary evaluations, performance assessments" and other personnel records that might otherwise be exempt from disclosure.

Specifically, the state Appeals Court found that officers' reports, witness interview summaries and internal affairs reports cannot be shielded from public view under the guise of constituting personnel information, since their "quintessential purpose" is to inspire public confidence, according to guidelines by the secretary of state's office.

Efforts to contact Slattery Thursday by phone and by email to discuss his employment status were unsuccessful.

Responding to questions from the newspaper, Petrini wrote that Slattery's responsibilities will be reviewed when he returns in January.

"The chief will evaluate Deputy Chief Slattery's specific role in the department when he returns from sick leave," Petrini wrote, "but anticipates he will be assigned an appropriate role consistent with the duties and responsibilities of a deputy chief."

Framingham deputy police chief placed on administrative leave May 4, 2016
Norman Miller 508-626-3823 Metrowest Daily News
FRAMINGHAM - A Framingham deputy police chief is on paid administrative leave, Chief Ken Ferguson said on Wednesday.

Ferguson said he placed Deputy Chief Kevin Slattery on paid administrative leave this week, but would not say why.

'That's all I can say right now because it's an active investigation,' Ferguson said.

Slattery is one of three deputy police chiefs. He is in charge of operations and oversees the department's communications department, community policing, crime scene services, the patrol division and the street crimes unit.

Slattery joined the Framingham Police Department in 1995. He was promoted to sergeant in 1992 and lieutenant in 2004. He was the head of the Framingham Police detective bureau when Ferguson promoted him to deputy chief in 2013.


In this article , we learn more about his leave.

Earlier this month, Ferguson placed a second officer - Deputy Chief Kevin Slattery - on paid administrative leave.

Slattery, the head of operations for the police department, oversees the patrol division and street crimes unit, as well as crime scene services and community policing efforts.

Ferguson previously declined to comment on the reasons behind the move, saying only that it was related to an "active investigation."

In an email Tuesday, Town Counsel Christopher Petrini wrote that Slattery was placed on leave "due to an alleged improper verbal comment he made regarding a subordinate." Petrini wrote that the town will not comment because it deals with an ongoing investigation of a personnel matter.

The Daily News has learned the town's human resources director has retained a legal firm with expertise in employment practices to investigate the allegations raised in Slattery's case. Efforts Thursday to contact Slattery's lawyer, William Mayer, were unsuccessful.

Petrini stressed that the decision to place Slattery on leave was "unrelated to the allegations of criminal conduct regarding Officer Dubeshter and the Framingham Police Department evidence room."

Brandolini, Slattery Both Promoted to Framingham Deputy Police Chief November 1, 2013
Susan Petroni 508-202-5597 Framingham Patch
Email: kxs@framinghamma.gov

Phone:  

Kevin J. Slattery has been a police officer in Framingham for 29 years. A graduate of Framingham North High School, he attended Northeastern University and Westfield State University and received a Fischer Price diploma and Bachelor's degree in criminal justice.

Slattery received his appointment to the Framingham Police Department in 1985, when he was just 21 years old and still a senior in college. He attended the Massachusetts State Police Academy in 1985. He had worked for three Framingham Police Chiefs - Arthur Martins, Chief Brent Larrabee and Chief Steven Carl and now his fourth, Chief Ferguson.

Slattery was assigned to the Framingham narcotics unit in 1987. He also served as a general duty investigator, until he was promoted to the position of sergeant in 1992. He was a patrol supervisor on all three shifts and then became the supervisor of the narcotics unit and the evening shift general duty detectives.

While working in narcotics he served in several Federal and Massachusetts task forces that targeting drugs and gangs. He also served as supervisor of investigators, working on cases from house breaks, sexual assaults to homicides.

In 2004, Slattery was promoted to the rank of lieutenant. He was reassigned to patrol where he served as a shift commander. He has been a commanding officer working on all three shifts. Slattery, during his career, had been assigned to a DEA task force investigation targeting narcotics activity and gang violence in Framingham.

Slattery was then reassigned to be the Commanding Officer of Investigative Services. In that position he oversaw the general investigations, street crimes investigations, narcotic investigations, school resource officers and crime scene services. Slattery currently maintains that position.

Slattery and the men and women that he that he works with on investigations has received numerous individual and unit awards from the Framingham Police department as well as state and federal law enforcement agencies.

Slattery will be the Framingham Deputy Chief of Operations which includes patrol and investigations.

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